Research Summary: Safety & Efficacy of Vitamin K1 Oral Versus Injectable in Newborns

I research the safety and efficacy of oral versus injectable vitamin K1. Below are the study citations and a brief summary. This is for informational purposes and you should not rely on this information when making a decision for your newborn–You must consult with your baby’s physician.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18982351
2009 European Study. “Recent epidemiological studies provide data on the effectiveness of different administration routes and dosing schemes. Infants of mothers taking drugs that inhibit vitamin K are at risk of early VKDB and should receive 1 mg intramuscular (i.m.) as soon as possible after birth. Classic VKDB is prevented by intramuscular as well as by oral administration of 1 mg vitamin K. In exclusively breastfed infants, single i.m. administration at birth is also effectively preventing (rare) late VKDB but single oral administration is not. If given orally, prophylaxis should be continued by either weekly administration of 1 mg till 12 weeks or repeating 2 mg at weeks 1 and 4. Daily administration of 25 microg offers insufficient protection. The only infants not fully protected in this way are those with yet unrecognized liver disease.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12892158
2003 Danish Follow-up Study. “Oral vitamin K prophylaxis at birth of 2 mg phytomenadione followed by weekly 1 mg oral vitamin K prophylaxis by the parents until 3 mo of age was an efficient prophylaxis against vitamin K bleeding disorder. Parental compliance with the regimen was good.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8922069
1996 Danish study. “No cases have been reported so far during the existent regimen: 2 mg at birth and 1 mg weekly orally administered vitamin K during the first 3 months of life. We consider the mentioned weekly regimen safe and appropriate.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2798607/
2002 international comparison of intramuscular (IM) versus oral prophylactic regimens of vitamin K in Australia, Britain, Canada, Germany, New Zealand and Switzerland.
• Increased incidence of late HDNB occurred when vitamin K prophylaxis was absent or given orally, especially if the infant had been exclusively breast-fed or had cholestasis.
• The ideal dose, timing and formulation for oral prophylaxis are unclear.
• No method of prevention, including injectable, is perfect.
• IM vitamin K prophylaxis is safe and the treatment of choice for the prevention of HDNB.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1428134
1992 Indian study. They concluded, “oral Vitamin K is as effective as injectable Vitamin K and its usage is recommended in our country to reduce complications and costs of parenteral therapy.”

Use Your Past to Pave Your Future

The road to Hell is wide and paved with good intentions. I can’t remember when I first heard this old adage, but the other night it rang loudly in my mind. The evening I had envisioned – a wholesome, relaxing homemade dinner with the children and filled with interesting conversations about their day followed by the stimulating intellectual discourse resulting from homework spanning six different grade levels — was doomed from the start. At first undaunted by an unexpected dinner-time soccer practice, my serenity quickly eroded with an upcoming social studies test, forgotten books at school, and the icing on the cake: the 6 p.m. announcement that an assignment requiring copious amounts of yet-to-be-purchased craft materials was due the next day. As I lay my head on the pillow hours later and a few Domino pizzas delivered to quickly feed the troops, my mind finally had time to catch up to my body. I took stock in the evening. What happened?

We’ve all experienced the disappointment when best-laid plans go awry. For those of us for whom this scenario seems to repeat itself in one form or another every day, it is critical that we pause to examine how we approach the maelstrom.

On this particular evening I thought back to my grandparents, recalling and yearning for the simplicity of times past. After all, they had it so easy, didn’t they? Well, no. My grandmother suffered from heart disease. While she did not have to build an Egyptian pyramid out of spaghetti at 10 p.m., the simpler life I imagine she had didn’t save her from chronic disease either.

Knowing I have a genetic risk of cardiovascular disease – and my life seems infinitely more complicated than my grandma’s in the 1950s – I realized in bed that night that I could look to my grandmother’s example and lay down my pavers differently. I can choose a path that will lead to a healthy heart and a happy life, while modeling a family culture handed down from earlier generations.  We cannot eliminate the stressors from our lives but we can navigate our potholes better.

Be real as a parent and simply roll with it. Once in a while a pizza night is in order. Stress is omnipresent, but we choose whether or not to let this get the best of us. Just as we model healthy behaviors in other aspects of our lives, our children look to us to show them the best way to weather the turbulence. Breathe, make the best of a trying situation and show your kids how
to have fun regardless. Remember kids have an easier time making fun than adults do – they will automatically fall behind your lighthearted leadership.

Practice mindfulness. This is not an esoteric ideal – it is the simple practice of being aware of one’s surroundings rather than letting life pass by cloaked in the distractions of daily life. Research indicates that mindfulness may reduce the risk of heart disease, improve psychological well-being, and reduce visits to the hospital. Yet in a 2010 Harvard study of 2,250 volunteers the subjects’ minds wandered an average of 46.9% of their waking time while engaged in a variety of activities. Find a moment for being quiet each day, and train yourself to put down the screen when eating a meal or waiting in a line. Mindfulness can also be learned through relaxation techniques such as meditation and yoga.

Be active every day. What will it take? Getting up a little earlier? Running (literally) the kids to school? Putting exercise time on the calendar? Exercise elevates mood, improves stamina, boosts the immune system, and reduces the risk of heart disease and depression among many other benefits. A little self-discipline will go a long way to ensure good health and vitality down the
road.

Build a strong and resilient body.  Eat a healthful diet with a variety of organic fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein, low-fat dairy and whole grains. Complement your healthy diet with nutritional supplements. The four I keep by my toothbrush are a whole food multivitamin (which I take in the morning) and a probiotic supplement, vitamin D, and fish oil caplets (which I take at night).

Go to bed! Eight hours every night is still what the doctor orders. We don’t allow our preschoolers to run around all night long, so why do we allow ourselves? Be the example. Go to bed each night when your body starts to feel tired. You will wake more refreshed, look younger and stay healthier.

Meeting the endless but very real daily needs of our families doesn’t require us to rush around in a whirling dervish. Stop. Look. Listen. Your past can show you the new pavers you can lay to create a healthier path for you and your family.

Thanks, Grandma.

Fighting with your teen can be a good thing

A growing body of research suggests that this can actually be a good thing. How disagreements are handled at home shapes both adolescent mental health and the overall quality of the parent-teenager relationship. Not only that, the nature of family quarrels can also drive how adolescents manage their relationships with people beyond the home.

In looking at how teenagers approach disputes, experts have identified four distinct styles: attacking, withdrawing, complying and problem-solving.

Adolescents who favor either of the first two routes — escalating fights or stubbornly refusing to engage in them — are the ones most likely to be or become depressed, anxious or delinquent.

Those teenagers who take the third route and comply, simply yielding to their parents’ wishes, suffer from high rates of mood disorders. Further, teenagers who cannot resolve arguments at home often have similar troubles in their friendships and love lives.

In contrast, teenagers who use problem-solving to address disputes with their parents present a vastly different picture. They tend to enjoy the sturdiest psychological health and the happiest relationships everywhere they go.

So how do we raise teenagers who see disagreements as challenges to be resolved?

Compelling new research suggests that constructive conflict between parent and teenager hinges on the adolescent’s readiness to see beyond his or her own perspective.

We also have evidence that parents can make the most of their teenagers’ evolving neurobiology by being good role models for taking another person’s perspective. Adults who are willing to walk around in their teenagers’ mental shoes tend to raise teenagers who return the favor.

garden-variety disagreements offer the opportunity to help young people better understand themselves and others, building in them the lifelong skill of finding room for civility in the midst of discord.

No parent looks forward to fighting with his or her teenage child. But the friction that comes with raising adolescents might be easier to take when we see it as an opening, not an obstacle.

(http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/…/the-best-way-to-fight-wit…/…)

Tips to Avoid Dental Fluorosis in Children

dental fluorosis

 

 

 

 

 

 

40% children have dental fluorosis so avoid the extra fluoride found in toothpaste, municipal drinking water, canned foods, nursery water and fluoride treatments, if possible. The CDC reports that the number of children with fluorosis is increasinghttp://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db53.htm

Tooth care tips for babies and children:

Only non-fluoride toothpaste under 2 years.

Only use fluoride toothpaste after 2 years every 2-3 days and non-fluoride toothpaste on the other days.

Start children flossing at 7-8 years old.

Avoid any toothpaste with sodium lauryl sulfate – this abrades the teeth.

There are also other health concerns with fluoride. Visit http://fluoridealert.org/issues/health/ for additional information.